ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Jayanta BandyopadhyaySubscribe to Jayanta Bandyopadhyay

‘Development’ and ‘Modernity’ in the Global South

The terms “development” and “modernity” have been used widely and diversely during the past several decades, and continue to be evoked extensively in the present time. Development is projected as the path to modernity, a unique and inevitably desirable state for all human societies. Notwithstanding...

Sustaining the Liquid Mosaic

This critique assesses if the National Water Framework Bill 2016 and the Mihir Shah Committee report are truly interdisciplinary and based on the principles of integrated water systems governance. The question still remains whether the recommendations are enough to bridge existing gaps and address future challenges in water governance.

New Institutional Structure for Water Security in India

There has been no significant change in the knowledge-base and institutional structure for managing water systems since colonial rule. This makes the recent efforts of the Ministry of Water Resources for restructuring the Central Water Commission and the Central Ground Water Board significant. This article argues that the effort should be backed by interdisciplinary studies that see surface water and groundwater as ecologically connected.

Theory and Practice in Ecology

Ecosystem Management: Towards Merging Theory and Practice by Dhrubajyoti Ghosh, New Delhi, Nimby Books, 2014; pp 270, Rs 390 paperback.

Human Footprint

In the aftermath of the catastrophic flashfloods and landslides that ravaged the state of Uttarakhand in mid-June 2013, we need to analyse the calamity and identify the role of human footprints on the Himalaya in magnifying the losses of life and property in the state.

Human Footprint on the Devabhoomi

In the aftermath of the catastrophic flash floods and landslides that ravaged the state of Uttarakhand in mid-June 2013, we need to analyse the calamity and identify the role of human footprint on the Himalaya in magnifying the losses of life and property in the state.

Studying Climate Change in India

Handbook of Climate Change and India:Development, Politics and Governance edited by Navroz K Dubash (New Delhi: Oxford University Press), 2011; pp xxiv + 400, Rs 1,250.

Water Science in India Hydrological Obscurantism

The proposal for addressing the twin problems of fl oods and water scarcity by interlinking rivers is based on an outdated and dangerous idea of surplus river basins from which water can be drawn at will. Global experience shows how damaging such plans of large-scale water transfer are to the environment, economy and livelihoods of the people. Such plans have also proved a failure to either prevent fl oods or provide water on a sustainable basis. It is unfortunate that water policy in India remains a prisoner to such obsolete ideas.

Political Challenge of an Intensifying Conflict over Land

How much of the benefits of economic growth accrue directly to farmers and workers who lose their livelihoods when agricultural land is taken over for development? If handled properly, the Land Acquisition and Rehabilitation and Resettlement Bill 2011 offers an opportunity for equitably addressing the interests of diverse sections affected by the land acquisition process.

A Nobel for the Commons: A Tribute to Elinor Ostrom

The Nobel Prize in Economics co-awarded to Elinor Ostrom marks a rare departure from the traditional approach of the selectors which hitherto has been characterised by adherence to sub-disciplines more explicitly recognised as falling within the discipline of economics, rather than those that govern an economic system from its exterior, created at the interface of political economy, economics and social anthropology. This essay is a tribute to her work taking into consideration the implications of her thought in the context of governance of commons in general, and in south Asia in particular.

Holistic Engineering and Hydro-Diplomacy in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Basin

The worldwide paradigm shift in river basin management has not affected policymakers in south Asia. Hydro-diplomacy in the Ganges-Brahmaputra- Meghna basin is still based on reductionist engineering, and looks at marginal economic benefits, without showing any concern for the long-run implications for livelihoods and ecosystem. The governments in the river basin are already facing the challenge of extreme poverty, despite the countries experiencing high levels of precipitation. This paper discusses the lacunae of the reductionist engineering paradigm, and stresses the need for a holistic framework in ecological engineering and for hydro-diplomacy in the basin. This framework is based on a new transdisciplinary knowledge base created by the emerging science of eco-hydrology, economics, and new institutional theories.

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