ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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'We Oppose the Death Penalty'

We, concerned citizens and organisations from different walks of life and with different world views, are united in opposing the death penalty and ­demanding its repeal in India. Though meant only for the rarest of rare crimes, the death penalty is widely being applied to an ever-increasing array...

Growth, Poverty and Reforms

India long suffered from a mindless commitment to policies that were advertised in the public policy domain as solutions to poverty and destitution but that tragically accentuated instead these tragic phenomena over decades. The economic reforms from 1991 onwards were meant to reverse the situation and have made a successful contribution. And yet we hear again sceptical voices against the reforms. Since a spirited response is necessary to prevent a roll back to the counterproductive policies of the past, it is useful to examine a few arguments against reforms in the public policy debate today that have superficial and hence popular appeal.

Indian Development Strategy- Some Comments

Indian Development Strategy Some Comments Jagdish Bhagwati T N Srinivasan SUKHAMOY CHAKRAVARTY'S Fifth G L Mehta Lecture (EPW, May 19-26) discuss ing India's development strategy for the 1980s it characterised by his customary erudition and lucidity of style. But its analysis of our past economic performance, and of our future pro- spects and the strategy for maximally improving them, raising several key questions. We can think of no better tribute to Sukhamoy Chakravarty's intellectual efforts than to address these questions and to indicate our agreements and disagreements with him. We hope that this will prompt a debate on the vital issues of Indian economic policy at this critical point in our history.

Political Response to the 1966 Devaluation

coastal Andhra industrial house in the past quarter century, (2) a sample of the headaches in starting a small industry

India, Pakistan, US and Bangla Desh

August 14, 1971 country, and the cost of an active policy in favour of Bangla Desh has been steeply raised. It will rise further as time goes on and we may be left with no alternative but to acquiesce in the suppression of Bangla Desh. Should this happen we will lose whatever goodwill there is among the East Bengalis for this country, and the only chance of creating a new orientation in the outlook of the people of the subcontinent.
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