ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Ethics and Theatrics

India’s Daughter reflects asymmetries of power and access, and of where and how discourses are generated and directed. Who represents whom, and how they do so, reflects many of these asymmetries and exposes many complicities. As to the question of why India’s Daughter was not made by anyone in India, this is one best answered by those who were most vociferous in their denunciation of the “ban.”

Ethics and Theatrics

“India’s Daughter” reflects asymmetries of power and access, and of where and how discourses are generated and directed. Who represents whom, and how they do so, reflects many of these asymmetries and exposes many complicities. As to the question of why “India’s Daughter” was not made by anyone in India, this is a question is best answered by those who were most vociferous in their denunciation of the “ban”.

National Judicial Appointments Commission

An assessment of the new law introduced to appoint judges argues that it will make the judiciary subservient to the executive and thus throws a fundamental challenge to the Constitution and Indian democracy. The long-pending demands for transparency and accountability of judges and for making the judiciary more representative have been forgotten in these new bills.

Concern for the Dead, Condemnation for the Living

While ruling that women were increasingly misusing Section 498A of the Indian Penal Code, the Supreme Court ought to have been more conscious of the prevalence of domestic violence, and the difficulties women face in approaching the police. When faced with evidence of a poor conviction rate, instead of inquiring whether the prosecution was poorly conducted, the Court assumes that the “disgruntled wives” filed false cases. Ironically, while the courts convict husbands and their families in cases of dowry deaths, the woman’s invocation of Section 498A when she fears for her life or demands her share of the matrimonial home, earns her the accusation of being a “disgruntled wife”.

Bringing Rights Home: Review of the Campaign for a Law on Domestic Violence

This paper visits the issue of domestic violence in India and explains why the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2006 was enacted, what ends were intended to be served and what gaps in the existing legal framework it was intended to plug. It gives a brief background to the feminist campaigns that led to revisions in criminal law, thus forcing the State to intervene in cases of violence in the home and the problems in the criminal law regime that led to the conceptualisation of a civil law to deal with domestic violence. It also discusses the post-enactment developments and the monitoring of the law.
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