ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Himanshu BurteSubscribe to Himanshu Burte

The Violence of Worlding

Over the last two decades, the state-led production of space, as part of worlding cities, has introduced new structural violences into the lives of poor groups in Durban, Mumbai and Rio de Janeiro, and has met with resistance. Three main mechanisms have been adopted to produce space—infrastructure and mega-projects, redevelopment, and creating exception regimes for “slums.” The nature of the state that enacts structural violence through worlding processes is simultaneously “strong” and “weak.” It is strong in its bid to open up new spaces for capital accumulation that integrate specific economic circuits, classes and groups “globally,” while weak in its responsibility to protect and strengthen the life chances and claims of poor groups/spaces.

The 'Smart City' Card

The "smart city" idea is extremely attractive, especially to the middle and upper classes who experience Indian cities as being anything but smart. It is a concept frequently thrown about but lacking a clear definition - though at heart it has emerged mainly as an instrument to make cities more competitive in economic terms. With real estate and urban infrastructure offering a great opportunity to global capital, it is a card waiting to be played right in India.

Intentions, Design and Outcomes

This paper examines the implementation of the Integrated Housing and Slum Development Programme in the smaller cities of Maharashtra. It discusses the reasons behind the poor quantitative and qualitative performance of the IHSDP in the state and examines why the programme has not been a success, either in terms of the completion rate or beneficiary satisfaction.

The Gandhi of Spatial Delight

Laurie Baker's creative vision and particular way of approaching a building problem are probably gone with his demise on April 1. The most valuable legacy he has left behind is proven success in the real world of construction and of critical thinking. The biggest challenge is to keep the habit of critical thought alive in everything related to building. A tribute to this remarkable architect.
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