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Karnataka s Power Sector-Some Revelations

Karnataka 's power sector uses the irrigation pump sets (IPS) package to hide many of its technical and commercial shortcomings, in particular its transmission and distribution losses. It can also allege 'shortages' and even 'crises' which are fertile ground for malpractices in the provision of connections, connected load and (legal and illegal) electricity consumption. They also 'justify' the invitations to private power with all the associated benefits, particularly in the case of foreign private power.

A Development-Focused End-Use-Oriented Electricity Scenario for Karnataka

Electricity Scenario for Karnataka Amulya Kumar IN Reddy Gladys D Sumithra P Balachandra Antonette D'Sa The recent efforts at electricity planning in Karnataka, in particular the May 1987 report of the Committee for preparing a 'Long Range Plan for Power Projects in Karnataka 1987-2000 AD' (LRPPP), are clear-cut examples of the failure of the conventional consumption-obsessed supply-biased approach to energy planning. This paper presents an alternative scenario for Karnataka's electricity sector on the basis of the development-focused end-use-oriented (DEFENDUS) paradigm.

A Development-Focused End-Use-Oriented Electricity Scenario for Karnataka

A Development-Focused End-Use-Oriented Electricity Scenario for Karnataka Amulya Kumar N Reddy Gladys D Sumithra P Balachandra Antoneite D'Sa The recent efforts at electricity planning in Karnataka, in particular the May 1987 report of the Committee for preparing a 'Long Range Plan for Power Projects in Karnataka 1987-2000 AD' (LRPPP), are clear-cut ex- amples of the failure of the conventional consumption-obsessed supply-biased approach to energy planning. This paper presents an alternative scenario for Karnataka's electricity sector on the basis of the development-focused end-use-oriented (DEFENDVS) paradigm.

Comparative Costs of Electricity Conservation-Centralised and Decentralised Electricity Generation

Amulya Kumar N Reddy Gladys D Sumithra P Balachandra Antonette d'Sa Energy planning, and the associated decision-making, requires choices between energy technologies. Thus far, these have been restricted to choices between supply options in particular, centralised energy technologies. But, this restriction to centralised sources is running into two major difficulties; (a) shortages of capital, and (b) popular opposition to the resulting local and global environmental degradation. Furthermore, what matters to a consumer of energy is not energy per se, but the services that energy provides. Hence, the true indicator of development is not the magnitude of energy used, but the level of energy services provided, It has, therefore, become essential to extend the list of options for energy decision-making so as to include both decentralised sources of supply, and energy efficiency improvements and other conservation options.
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