ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Economic Liberalisation and Indian Agriculture: A Statewise Analysis

This study of the performance of agriculture at the state level in India during the post-reform period (1990-93 to 2003-06) and the immediate pre-reform period (1980-83 to 1990-93) shows that the post-reform period has been characterised by deceleration in the growth rate of crop yields as well as total agricultural output in most states. By ending discrimination against tradable agriculture, economic reforms were expected to improve the terms of trade in favour of agriculture and promote its growth. The paper also discusses the cropping pattern changes that have taken place in area allocation as well as in terms of value of output. The slowdown in the process of cropping pattern change means that most government efforts to diversify agriculture have failed to take off.

Making Growth Inclusive

 Making Growth Inclusive G S Bhalla India Development Report, 2008 contains a set of contributions by eminent scholars on the issues associated with sustaining high growth, achieving macroeconomic stability, quality and adequacy of higher education, employment, agrarian crisis, making growth inclusive and the implications of globalisation. Growth PatternThe article by Manoj Panda on

Rural Employment and Poverty

This paper discusses the likely scenarios regarding employment and income growth in agriculture and non-agriculture in rural and urban areas under various assumptions about sectoral growth rates and employment elasticities. It is evident that India faces a problem in generating enough employment in the years ahead to keep pace with the growth in the labour force as also in raising wages and productivity of workers. Against this backdrop the authors consider possible strategies for increasing employment significantly reducing rural and urban poverty by 2020.

Foodgrains Demand in India to 2020-A Preliminary Exercise

This paper attempts to project feed and food demand for India to 2020 under alternative income growth scenarios: " These alternatives are: continuation of current trend of 3.5 per cent growth in per capita income; acceleration of growth in per capita income to 5.5 per cent; raising the entire poor above the poverty line ('Non-poor India '); and ensuring that every one is well fed in terms of calories ('Well-fed India

Recent Developments in Indian Agriculture-A State Level Analysis

A State Level Analysis G S Bhalla Gurmail Singh This paper presents the results of an analysis of state level data on area and output of 43 crops for the 30 years from 1962-65 to 1992-95. It reveals that there was a marked acceleration in the growth rate of agricultural output in India during 1980-83 to 1992-95 as compared with the earlier periods. Furthermore,.agricultural growth had become regionally much more diversified. The period 1980-83 to 1992-95 was also characterised by important cropping pattern changes away from coarse cereals towards rice and wheat cultivation on the one hand and towards oilseeds on the other. Finally, the 1980s also witnessed a widespread acceleration in per male agricultural worker productivity in many Indian states. If sustained, high labour productivity growth is likely not only to result in higher wages but also to trigger growth in the non-agricultural sector through input output and consumption linkages.

Spatial Pattern of Agricultural Development in India

in India G S Bhalla D S Tyagi With the adoption of new seed fertiliser technology, agriculture in major parts of India has undergone a significant transformation. The yield levels of some crops have experienced phenomenal rise, thereby accelerating the growth of agricultural output in states where these crops constitute an important component of the cropping pattern. Whereas to begin with, during 1962-65 to 1970-73, the green revolution was confined to only a few northwestern states, it seems to have gradually extended to many other parts of India during the seventies, though this extension is still much too narrowly confined. This paper seeks to study the spatial pattern of agricultural growth in the country, taking 19 major crops which account for 82 to 90 per cent of both area and value of output in the different states. Also discussed are the changes in male agricultural worker productivity THE main purpose of this paper is to highlight the spatial pattern of the levels and growth in agricultural output in the country, as also the variations in labour productivity at the state level In the case of foodgrains, the analysis is based on the comparison between the quinquennia ending major crops, the analysis is based on the

Labour Productivity in Indian Agriculture

G S Bhalla Y K Alagh The results of regression exercises for various subsets of districts classified according to growth of output tend to confirm the hypothesis that labour productivity in agriculture is determined by the use of capital inputs on the one hand and output-augmenting modern biological inputs on the other. Since high growth districts are the predominant users of available tractors and tubewells (and other inputs) in the country, capital intensity per worker is the main determinant of labour productivity in these districts. Fixed capital alone is important, but the addition of variables like gross cropped area and fertilisers results in significant increase in the explanation of variation in labour productivity.

Green Revolution and the Small Peasant-A Study of Income Distribution in Punjab Agriculture

This paper evaluates the impact of the green revolution on income distribution among cultivating households in Punjab. The authors analyse the production structure and income levels of various farm-size categories. An attempt is also made to examine the emerging pattern of consumption with increase in income brought about by technological change in agriculture. While the analysis covers all categories of cultivators in general, the focus of the study is on bringing out the relative position of marginal and small farmers in the production, income and consumption nexus.

Green Revolution and the Small Peasant-A Study of Income Distribution in Punjab Agriculture

This paper evaluates the impact of the green revolution on income distribution among cultivating households in Punjab. The authors analyse the production structure and income levels of various farm-size categories. An dttempt is also made to examine the emerging pattern of consumption with increase in income brought about by technological change in agriculture. While the analysis covers all categories of cultivators In general, the focus of the study is on bringing out the relative position of marginal and small farmers in the production, income and consumption nexus.

Transfer of Technology and Agricultural Development in India

This paper examines critically same widely-supported formulations about the impact of new technology in agriculture. The first port of the paper briefly reviews the development of Indian agriculture since independence and examines whether there is a correlation between growth and the application of modern science and technology in the spatial pattern of agricultural development in the country.
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