ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Gender Audit of Maharashtra Budget

This study attempts to identify women-related expenditure in the Maharashtra budget, in order to estimate the share of budgetary resources actually provided for women vis-à-vis policy pronouncements, the purposes of such allocation, and the utilisation of funds. It shows that despite the professed concern for women in the state, especially in relation to the declining sex ratio, the allocation continues to be minuscule. However, merely increasing the provision of funds does not automatically lead to the establishment of gender equality or empowerment of women. Policies for women must take cognisance of their needs, problems and choices, and incorporate them in the design of programmes.

Does EGS Require Restructuring for Poverty Alleviation and Gender Equality?

The Employment Guarantee Scheme (EGS) initiated in Maharashtra in the early 1970s is the oldest and the largest public works programme in the developing world. It has been the subject of numerous studies that have highlighted the positive effects of EGS on the rural economy of Maharashtra. Yet none of these has furnished concrete evidence for most of these inferred effects. Moreover, there have been no investigations since the 1990s, when both the rural economy of Maharashtra and the EGS have undergone significant changes in size, character and direction. This article reviews the EGS to assess whether it requires restructuring for poverty alleviation and gender equality. Part I of the article (which appeared in the issue of April 17, 2004) examined the concept, design and delivery system of the EGS, so as to assess its effectiveness against poverty and pinpoint its limitations. Part II highlights the issues including gender concerns that need to be addressed before restructuring the scheme.

Does EGS Require Restructuring for Poverty Alleviation and Gender Equality?

The Employment Guarantee Scheme (EGS) initiated in Maharashtra in the early 1970s is the oldest and the largest public works programme in the developing world. It has been the subject of numerous studies that have highlighted the positive effects of EGS on the rural economy of Maharashtra. Yet none of these has furnished concrete evidence for most of these inferred effects. Moreover, there have been no investigations since the 1990s, when both the rural economy of Maharashtra and the EGS have undergone significant changes in size, character and direction. This article reviews the EGS to assess whether it requires restructuring for poverty alleviation and gender equality. Part I of the article examines the concept, design and delivery system of the EGS, so as to assess its effectiveness against poverty and pinpoint its limitations. Part II will highlight the issues including gender concerns that need to be addressed before restructuring the scheme.

Responses to Domestic Violence

Minimally construed as the physical, mental, emotional and sexual abuse of a woman in her intimate relationship, domestic violence in the Indian context includes intimidating acts by the members (both men and women) of her marital family. Often condoned by culture, such systemic violence enforces gender inequality by curtailing a woman's freedom and right to self-determination. How do government and non-government organisations respond to complaints of domestic violence by women victims or their families, or even outsiders? What problems do the agencies face in constructing a response?
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