ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Dilip SubramanianSubscribe to Dilip Subramanian

A Sociological Profile of a Public Sector Workforce

The article presents the results of a sociological survey of the Bangalore workforce of the Indian Telephone Industries, integrating within it an historical perspective by taking into account inter-generational evolution. The results throw light on changes, big and small, intervening in the morphology of the workforce from one generation to the next, largely in response to evolution of management policy, itself a result of the latter's engagement with the constantly unfolding political, social and economic context in which it operates.

France: Riots and the Immigrant Community

The recent riots have uncovered the need for France to recast its republican model of integration. This model where no racial, linguistic or religious differences are recognised has come under strain in part because the educational system has failed to socialise immigrant children into the values, norms and heritage of the nation state. But a larger part of the blame also lies in the economic crisis that has left most immigrant graduates either unemployed or engaged in low paid, insecure, dead-end jobs.

Deregulation and Labour Policies in a Public Sector Firm

This paper aims to examine how ITI sought to respond to the challenges and threats posed by deregulation, and the impact these actions had on the employees. It concentrates on the initiatives pursued by the company in order to build a workforce and forge labour policies tailored more closely to the imperatives of competition, and evaluates how far these objectives were achieved. For in the management's own words, ITI needed to evolve from being a 'production agency of DoT' to a 'business company' - an evolution which called for it to embrace new strategic options as well as new ways of doing things, if it was to stand a chance of survival in the changed business environment. In the field of labour relations, these revised priorities would take two main directions: the implementation of a voluntary retirement scheme (VRS), and the tightening of disciplinary controls together with cutbacks in welfare benefits.

Impact of Deregulation on a Public Sector Firm

This paper explores the manner in which state-owned telecommunications equipment manufacturer Indian Telephone Industries was affected by the radically altered market conditions brought about by the opening up of the economy and the loss of its monopoly status. ITI's experience shows that the government's market-oriented reform programme ended up creating anything but a level-playing field for public enterprises. On the one hand, by eliminating its monopoly privileges but not the constraints flowing from state ownership, and on the other hand, by imposing new market-related constraints, deregulation had an extremely destabilising effect on the operations of ITI.

Government Wage Policies in Public Sector, 1947-1982

Since independence the government has striven to adopt wage fixation policies with regard to public sector organised labour. Initially the role was discharged by the judiciary and a while later by a tripartite machinery - the wage boards. However, the setting up of the Bureau of Public Enterprises in the early 1960s signalled a shift to greater centralisation. Despite the bureau's existence as a 'supra-bureaucracy', its attempts to impose wage standardisation and salary restraints, but for a brief period during the emergency years, proved by and large ineffectual.

Unity Building Efforts by Public Sector Unions and Managements in Bangalore, 1960s to 1970s

and Managements in Bangalore, 1960s to 1970s Dilip Subramanian The history of the Bangalore public sector unions' endeavours to achieve unity in the 1960s and 1970s is also a history of disunity, trade union politicking and petty personal rivalries. For the leadership of the different workers ' organisations there was nothing 'historically inevitable' about combining their resources and numerical strengths in the interests of their members. This paper traces the different collective bodies thrown up by the unions, and examines their structural features and internal dynamism.

Bangalore Public Sector Strike, 1980-81-A Critical Appraisal

A Critical Appraisal II: The Strike Dilip Subramanian The longest and costliest conflict in the history of the public sector in India, the Bangalore public sector strike of 1980-81 possessed a number of characteristics specific to it, The confrontation directly pitted the unions against the government and that too the central government which could deploy the full might of all the institutions of state power to smash the workers' resistance. This would have a decisive influence on the nature and outcome of the struggle. Secondly, even though generalised and massive, the strike was above all an affair of the leadership. Beyond a few symbolic agitations, the Joint Action Front made no serious attempt to draw the mass of workers into the struggle. This again would have an important effect on the distribution of power between the two sides during the course of the struggle. Thirdly, the strike remained, by and large' extremely peaceful despite the highly aggressive attitude of the government in the later stages of the conflict. Finally, this was the first time in the country that a collective leadership coming from different political horizons was leading such a large strike and for such a long period. From start to finish, the workers' representatives manifested a remarkable degree of unity and allowed no dissensions to trouble the organisation and co-ordination of the struggle.

Bangalore Public Sector Strike, 1980-81-A Critical Appraisal, I: The Settlements of 1973 and 1978

Bangalore Public Sector Strike, 1980-81 A Critical Appraisal I: The Settlements of 1973 and 1978 Dilip Subramanian The longest and costliest conflict in the history of the public sector in India, the Bangalore public sector strike of 1980-81 possessed a number of characteristics specific to it. The confrontation directly pitted the unions against the government and that too the central government which could deploy the full might of all the institutions of state power to smash the workers' resistance. This would have a decisive influence on the nature and outcome of the struggle. Secondly, even though generalised and massive, the strike was above all an affair of the leadership. Beyond a few symbolic agitations, the Joint Action Front made no serious attempt to draw the mass of workers into the struggle. This again would have an important effect on the distribution of power between the two sides during the course of the struggle. Thirdly, the strike remained, by and large, extremely peaceful despite the highly aggressive attitude of the government in the later stages of the conflict. Finally, this was the first time in the country that a collective leadership coming from different political horizons was leading such a large strike and for such a long period. From start to finish, the workers' representatives manifested a remarkable degree of unity and allowed no dissensions to trouble the organisation and co-ordination of the struggle.
Back to Top