ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

D ParthasarathySubscribe to D Parthasarathy

Kamala Mills Fire and the Perilous Gentrification of Mumbai

Looking at the larger history of deindustrialisation, gentrification, and change in patterns of land use in what was known as Mumbai’s Girangaon area, the article seeks to explain the recent tragic fire accident in the Kamala Mills compound as an example of the multiple risks in a chaotic and perilous landscape.

Coastal Ecology and Fishing Community in Mumbai

A critique of the Coastal Regulation Zone rules studies their implementation, and violations in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region, which has experienced massive growth due to rapid economic transformation and urbanisation, resulting in degradation of and damage to sensitive coastal ecologies. Mumbai's artisanal fishers, especially the Kolis, are intensely subjected to survival and livelihood pressures. Sustaining the livelihoods of the Kolis and preserving coastal ecosystems is crucial for the city's sustainability. An evaluation of the state's role in implementing CRZ rules links the politics around CRZ to larger issues of livelihood and environmental sustainability. Field research in selected sites provides insights for small-scale fishery-based livelihoods and environmental sustainability.

Hunters, Gatherers and Foragers in a Metropolis: Commonising the Private and Public in Mumbai

Mumbai is in reality a city of places that are not a part of the current set of fantasies that rule the minds of urban planners but are yet integrally linked to capitalist processes, to urban practices of place-making and to urbanism itself. From this perspective, this enquiry seeks not only to better understand and explain the processes that are forcing out the city's less privileged from its commons, but also imagine how a more inclusive future could be achieved.

Science, Astrology, and Democratic Society

The proposal of the University Grants Commission (UGC) to start courses in astrology has drawn predictable responses. These have by and large opposed astrology because it is not ‘scientific’, thereby unthinkingly and uncritically valorise ‘science’ as it is practised and taught. Both the content and utility of science, in their arguments, are sacrificed at the altar of method and procedure. Astrology, it is being said, cannot be introduced in universities because they cannot meet the scientific standards of reliability, validity, and falsification among others. At the same time, the larger context in which astrology is located in Indian (read Hindu) society is ignored. This discussion is based on articles in the media, many written by leading scientists, criticising the UGC proposal.
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