ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles by Chirayu JainSubscribe to Chirayu Jain

Building Workers under the New Labour Codes

In October 2020, the Bharatiya Janata Party-controlled Parliament had, in a tearing hurry, passed the remaining three labour codes— the Industrial Relations Code, Code on Social Security, and Code on Occupational Safety, Health and Working Conditions Code. The versions of these codes tabled before the Parliament were never put out in the public domain for comments. The codes were passed within a day through the Lok Sabha without proper debate, and the next day, they were introduced and passed as the opposition boycotted the Rajya Sabha. With this, many labour law legislations, rights, and protections stand undone in the name of a mere consolidation exercise. This article attempts to scrutinise how the Social Security Code and the Occupation Safety, Health and Working Conditions Code could affect the lives and rights of workers in the construction industry.

Reviewing the Labour Code on Industrial Relations Bill, 2015

The National Democratic Alliance government released an early draft of a bill attempting to codify the statutes dealing with industrial relations, that is, the Trade Unions Act, 1926, Industrial Disputes Act, 1947, and Industrial Employment (Standing Orders)Act, 1946. The Labour Code on Industrial Relations Bill, 2015, is one of the three labour codes the government is working on to consolidate all the important labour legislation. It is important to analyse the text of the 2015 bill when the ruling party’s own affiliate, Bharatiya Mazdoor Sangh, protests against the proposed bill.

Constitutionality and Legality of Foreign National/NRI/NRI-sponsored Reservation Quotas

The issue of deciding fees and reservation policies has been long contested between the state, and the minority and private institutions before the courts. Most educational institutions reserve seats for foreign nationals/non-resident Indians/NRI-sponsored applicants based on their ability to pay the higher fees charged, and the privilege of either possessing a foreign passport, or just knowing someone who lives on foreign shores. The constitutionality and legality of this quota, and the form and the manner in which it is being implemented in the national law universities is examined.

Accessibility and Inclusivity at National Law School

Institutional support and awareness of the diversity of their student intake by institutions of higher education, particularly when we have affirmative action policies in place, is essential to reduce the influence of students’ background on their performance. A socio-economic census conducted at the National Law School of India University, Bengaluru, covering 97.9% of the student body, presents the details about inclusivity and accessibility at the country’s premier law institute by analysing the correlations between background factors and performance.
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