ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By C H Hanumantha Rao

Rising Inequalities in Income in India

According to a study by Lucas Chancel and Thomas Piketty (2017), the average annual real per adult income growth in India accelerated from 1.7% during 1951–80 to 3.3% during 1980–2015. However, for the bottom 50% income group, it decelerated from 2.2% to 1.9% over the same period, despite acceleration from 1.2% to 5.1% for the top 10% income group and from 0.2% to 6.6% for the top 1% income group. These growing income inequalities in India are part of a larger set of rising income inequalities in several parts of the world; according to the World Social Report 2020 by the United Nations (2020), two-thirds of the world’s population today lives in countries where income inequality has grown. Moreover, “the ratio between the incomes of the richest and the poorest 10% of global population is 25% larger than it would be in a world without global warming,” as, among other factors, “at similar levels of exposure, people in poverty are more susceptible to damage from climate change than those who are better off” (United Nations 2020: 7).

The New Telangana State

A new social framework which is participatory and accountable to stakeholders is a prerequisite for inclusive and sustainable development of the new state of Telangana which is to be created soon. The socio-economic challenges are in providing land security to the tribals, expanding surface irrigation, creating power-generating capacity and in providing better state provision of health and education services.

India and China: A Comparison of the Role of Sociopolitical Factors in Inclusive Growth

The objective of economic planning in India and China, which started in both countries in the early 1950s, has been to step up economic growth and achieve equitable distribution of the benefits from growth. This article attempts to understand the experience of the two countries in achieving equitable growth under contrasting sociopolitical systems during their plan periods spanning over half a century.

Srikrishna Committee on Telangana: Recommendations at Variance with the Analysis

The Srikrishna Committee's analysis suggests that a separate Telangana can be a viable state and that a larger majority of the people in the region favour statehood. If a separate state is yet not the most preferred option then this has been on account of the vehement opposition from the Seemandhra region and the committee's own fears about more demands for smaller states cropping up as well as Telangana becoming a stronghold of Maoism and religious fundamentalism. Above all, the Srikrishna Committee's preference shows that in our system, opting for radical change by moving away from the status quo is not easy.