ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Bashir ManzarSubscribe to Bashir Manzar

The Mystery of the Sopore Killings

Sopore in north Kashmir is in the grip of fear and anxiety after six people were killed in less than a month's time. Separatist and militant groups blame the government and security agencies for the killings, while security forces claim the killers are renegade militants. Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar's statement about using terrorists to neutralise terrorists has inevitably got linked to the situation, bringing back hoary memories of the mid-1990s, when the counter-insurgency group Ikhwan-ul-Muslimoon became a law unto itself. Ambiguous statements by militants have aggravated such fears, while the government has done nothing to allay apprehensions.

The Mystery of Sopore Killings

Sopore in north Kashmir is in grip of fear and anxiety after six people were killed in less than a month’s time. Separatist and militant groups blame the government and security agencies for the killings, while security forces claim the killers are renegade militants. Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar’s statement about using terrorists to neutralise terrorists has inevitably got linked to the situation, bringing back hoary memories of the mid-1990s, when the counter insurgency group Ikhwan ul-Muslimoon became a law unto itself. Ambiguous statements by militants have aggravated such fears, while the government has done nothing to allay apprehensions.

Kashmir: A Tale of Two Communities, Cloven

Anuradha Bhasin Jamwal's review ("A Moon of Many Shades", 27 April 2013) of Rahul Pandita's book, Our Moon Has Blood Clots, led to responses from Pandita ("Selective Memory, Collective Amnesia", 1 June 2013) and Sualeh Keen ("Inconvenient People", 8 June 2013). Two more articles engage with the contentious issue of the migration/exile of Kashmiri Pandits in early 1990 and the responsibility for the same, which this discussion has opened up.
Back to Top