ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Capital Inputs in Punjab Agriculture - 1950-51 to 1964-65

 B Sen Adoption of the new agricultural technology in India seems to have been accompanied by an in- creased investment in new forms of capital equipment by farmers. The most pronounced increase in this respect has taken place in Punjab, and to a lesser extent in Haryana and Western Uttar Pradesh. On the whole, the increase has been greater in the wheat belt than in the rice belt.

Opportunities in the Green Revolution

Two opposite views have crystallised in the current debate on the indirect effects of the "new agricultural policy". According to one of these views, the policy is responsible for widening the gap, and for the growing polarisation, between the rich and the poor. The second view on the other hand holds that the most important indirect effect of the new policy has been the hastening of the process of modernisation of agriculture.

Regional Dispersion of Agricultural Income- Implications of the New Technology

(a) to bring together relevant data on the spatial distribution of agricultural income and to squeeze as much information as possible out of these data; and, (b) to attempt preliminary projections of agricultural income distribution among the States for five years hence, incorporating the effects of the new technology.
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