ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Atul Bhardwaj

India–China and the Emerging Global South

The global South is discontented and aims to exert its influence in reshaping global politics and finance. China and India emerge as the primary contenders for leadership in the developing and underdeveloped world. While India seeks to reform the post-war order, China endeavours to revolutionise it. India’s approach may not be fundamentally opposed to the West, as its efforts are focused on discouraging poorer nations from being lured by Chinese financial incentives. The Western powers are apprehensive about the prospect of the postcolonial developing world uniting, especially under Russian and Chinese influence. They aim to counteract such unity, ensuring that it remains fragmented.

Germany in Central Asia

The Ukraine crisis has solidified the Sino-Russian geopolitical alliance. Growing relations between the two will only cement their grip on the Central Asian Republics, pushing Western political and economic engagement with the region to the margins. Germany is taking on more responsibilities in Central Asia, in part to counteract Russia and China’s influence in the region. In addition, in view of the growing transcontinental linkages, it intends to strengthen its position in the newly formed trade and transportation macro region, which runs from the Baltic Sea to the Indian Ocean and from Eastern Europe to Central and East Asia.

The Eurasian Economic Union and India

The Eurasian Economic Union has great potential to integrate the economies of India, Central Asian countries, the Rus­sian Federation, and China. In the present circumstances, with realigned trade flows post the Ukraine crisis, it is in India’s interest to actively participate in the de­velopment of both the
Interna­tional North–South Transport Corridor and the Northern Sea Route.

The Land–Sea Conundrum

The world is reorienting away from its fixation with exclusive reliance on sea lanes of communication, as the fulcrum of international trade and politics, and its embrace of modern connectivity imperatives. The emerging Eurasian land bridges are now the biggest disrupter of the existing maritime order and impacting the global power shift. The maritime-continental disequilibrium is once again determining the contours of conflicts and contestations in global politics. The new transcontinental linkages and continental value chains are challenging the monopoly of international trade management by Western maritime powers.

German Strategic Autonomy Is Antithetical to American Primacy

Germany’s core strategic interests are at variance with that of the United States. The alliance between the two major transatlantic powers is under severe stress. The war in Ukraine has added an undue burden on the German economy, which is likely to lead to inflation, recession and social unrest. Germany, an emerging hard power, does not intend to let inflation, recession and social unrest derail it from the path of pursuing its foreign policy objectives. In the coming decades, Germany is not likely to sacrifice its economic interests at the altar of liberal international order and this is likely to pose a bigger challenge to German–American ties in the long run.

Ukraine War and the Perils of ‘Self-determination’

The right of “self-determination of the people” is a double-edged sword. It has been used by postcolonial nations to reclaim their territories and economy. The idea has also been exploited by the powerful countries to divide the world on ethnic and religious lines to advance their hegemony through humanitarian interventions.