ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Arvind SardanaSubscribe to Arvind Sardana

Financial Literacy in Rural Banking

Financial literacy in the present Indian policy context is seen as an instrument to raise demand for banking services. The location of the problem as one of deficient demand is untenable. The conception of financial literacy, as reflected in the Reserve Bank of India's Financial Literacy Guide, is packed with stereotypes of the poor as ignorant and in need of moral lessons on savings, consumption and credit. Financial literacy has to be positioned within a broader conceptual view of the financial system, so as to become a tool to raise critical consciousness and equip people to respond to the challenges posed by the financial sector. Further, financial literacy material must evolve from below, such that lives of the common people are organically a part of it. This paper also hints that the campaign mode for financial literacy might allow for greater public engagement and action. The effects of financial literacy, however, will not accrue if it is not accompanied by adequate outreach of banking services through credible public institutions.

The CBSE and NCERT Are Meant for Each Other

In his commentary (“Pedagogy Market: The CBSE-Pearson Tie-up”, EPW, 1 December 2012) Krishna Kumar analyses the implications of the decision of the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) to partner with Pearson for research and development of methods for school evaluation systems, rather than...

Teaching Economics in Schools

The curricular changes based on the National Curriculum Framework (2005) have enfolded Economics education at the school level. This article reviews in detail the imperative for and the main elements of the change, and argues that the issues involved merit the attention of professional economists.
Back to Top