ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Ankush AgrawalSubscribe to Ankush Agrawal

A Cartographic Mess

Population and area are the two most essential statistics describing any jurisdiction. Area is the more fundamental of the two because population is defined for a given area. The anomalies in estimates of Nagaland’s area are examined.

Infirmities in NSSO Data for Nagaland

The samples of the National Sample Survey Office are unlikely to be representative of Nagaland. This is so not because of the size of the sample, but because of the arbitrary restriction to villages within 5 kms of bus routes, whereas the bulk of the rural and tribal population is located farther from the roads. Further, it is argued that the Census of India data, which is used as the sampling frame, is found to be unreliable for Nagaland.

Nagaland's Demographic Somersault

After two decades of very high growth, Nagaland's population declined between 2001 and 2011 though there were no epidemical diseases, wars, famines, natural calamities, political disturbances, or any significant changes in the state's socio-economic characteristics. This decline is unprecedented in the history of independent India. It has been shown that the census estimates of the state's population for 1981-2001 are internally inconsistent. In the light of this, this paper uses information from the Sample Registration System and National Family Health Surveys to examine the reliability of the census figures in Nagaland between 1971 and 2011. It suggests that the census estimates are inconsistent with these sources of information.
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