ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Caste and Agrarian Class

The nexus that exists between class power and the state compounds the continuing oppression of the 'underclass' in Bihar. State operations further perpetuate the connections between caste and class. Thus land reforms ostensibly designed to benefit the disadvantaged are subverted by vested interests who dominate the state's politics and administration. Any attempt on the part of the underclass to politically mobilise has been met by brutal state repression by dominant caste militias. The all-pervasive gender bias that allows the exploitation of women, and the raging illiteracy that afflicts the underclass accentuates this oppression.

Selective Readings of Feminist Scholarship

Selective Readings of Feminist Scholarship Anand Chakravarti FEMINIFICATION of Theory' (March 25) by Dipankar Gupta (DG) suffers from two major limitations: first, it draws entirely from a restricted aspect of western experience, and that too in a highly tendentious manner; and second, fundamentally, it is based on a one-sided understanding of feminist scholarship, that which revolves round the symbolic representation of the female body and associated bodily processes.

Ecology and Agrarian Relations in Purnea

Ecology and Agrarian Relations in Purnea Anand Chakravarti CHRISTOPHER U HILL'S recent article1 throws much light on the impact of ecological factors on agrarian relations during the 18th and 19th centuries in Dharampur/wya/iff, the segment of the Darbhanga zamindah estate falling in Ohamdaha revenue circle in Purnea district. However, it seems to me that the author has used his analysis of the fluid tenurial conditions that prevailed while the river Kosi traversed the area (between 1770 and 1893, as stated by him) to explain the oppression of the actual cultivators not only during this period but during the 20th century

The Unfinished Struggle of Santhal Bataidars in Purnea District, 1938-42

in Purnea District, 1938-42 Anand Chakravarti In recent years the countryside in Bihar has been convulsed by severe agrarian tensions arising to a large extent from the deliberate negligence on the part of the government of issues affecting the interests of oppressed sections, such as tenants-at-will and agricultural labourers. The persistence of the problems of these sections is an outcome of the failure of the Indian National Congress to effectively integrate agrarian issues with its programme for attaining Independence. This argument has been demonstrated here by examining in detail the struggle of the Santhal bataidars (sharecroppers who were tenants-at-will) against their maliks (comprising tenure-holders and occupancy tenants) in Dhamdaha revenue circle in the western part of Purnea district between 1938 and 1942. The conflict occurred in a political environment dominanted partly by the national movement and partly by the struggles of the upper layers of the tenantry against the zamindars in Bihar The capacity of the Bihar Provincial Kisan Sabha and the Congress to take up the problems of tenants-at-will has been critically examined, and a point of view that endorses the tatter's position giving primacy to the campaign against colonial rule, while postponing the solution of agrarian issues till the attainment of Independence, has been questioned.

The Unfinished Struggle of Santhal Bataidars in Purnea District, 1938-42

The Unfinished Struggle of Santhal Bataidars in Purnea District, 1938-42 Anand Chakravarti In recent years the countryside in Bihar has been convulsed by severe agrarian tensions arising to a large extent from the deliberate negligence on the part of the government of issues effecting the interests of oppressed sections, such as tenants-at-will and agricultural labourers. The persistence of the problems of these sections is an outcome of the failure of the Indian National Congress to effectively integrate agrarian issues with its programme for attaining Independence. This argument has been demonstrated here by examining in detail the struggle of the Santhal bataidars (sharecroppers who were tenants-at-will) against their maliks (comprising tenure-holders and occupancy tenants) in Dhamdaha revenue circle in the western pari of Purnea district between 1938 and 1942. The conflicr occurred in a political environment dominanted partly by the national movement and partly by the struggles of the upper layers of the tenantry against the zamindars in Bihar. The capacity of the Bihar Provincial Kisan Sabha and the Congress to take up the problems of tenants-at-will has been critically examined, and a point of view that endorses the latter's position giving primacy to the campaign against colonial rule, while postponing the solution of agrarian issues till the attainment of Independence, has been questioned.

General Elections of 1967 in a Rajasthan Village

This paper is based on a study of voting behaviour and election campaign and issues during the 1967 general elections to the Rajasthan Assembly in an area which falls under the jurisdiction of the Devisor Village Panchayat. Since no Panchayat area can be treated in isolation from the constituency as a whole, the study covers events in the constituency forming its environment as well as reference to the wider canvas of State politics.

Traditional Caste Systems as Involute Systems-A Note on the Washermen of a Village in Rajasthan

A Note on the Washermen of a Village in Rajasthan Anand Chakravarti F G Bailey, while referring to caste systems in "traditional Indian society" endorses Fredrik Barth's view that caste systems are involute systems in the sense that one status for a caste necessarily implies a series of other equivalent statuses. In modern India, however, Bailey believes that systems have ceased to be involute because, according to him, "the village provided a boundary at which relations turned inwards Nowadays people have an economic and political relationship beyond that boundary. By this route castes which are ritually or politically low in the village may become wealthy".

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