ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Amit ThoratSubscribe to Amit Thorat

Experiences and Perceptions of Discrimination among Dalits and Muslims

Through the use of new survey data, the experiences and perceptions of discrimination among Dalits and Muslims have been quantified. One important result is that many respondents report experiencing discrimination at school and in interactions with government officials. These results are even more worrisome when we consider that self-reports of discrimination perhaps underestimate the true extent of the problem.

Explicit Prejudice

A representative phone survey to study explicit prejudice against women and Dalits in Delhi, Mumbai, Uttar Pradesh, and Rajasthan reveals widespread prejudice in several domains and discusses the consequences for women and Dalits, and society as a whole. The results suggest the need for a more robust public discourse and active approach to measuring and challenging prejudice and discrimination.

Beyond the Great Indian Nutrition Debate

Taking on the argument that malnutrition in India is caused by forces that respond only partially to policy interventions, this article points out that it is important to look at the role of disease conditions - shaped by inadequate water, poor sanitation, and insufficient public health measures - in poor nutrition. Moreover, the relationship between disease and food intake is multiplicative rather than additive, and omission of disease conditions from the discourse biases any arguments made about income, caloric intake and nutrition. A holistic view shows that there is room to hope that the nutritional status of children in India will improve with the right policy emphasis.

Ethnicity, Caste and Religion: Implications for Poverty Outcomes

In the factors that affect income and poverty outcomes, there are some features unique to India. Caste, ethnicity, religion and even regional origins all influence income outcomes. Therefore while examining individual poverty, the influence of social belongings on the level and the nature of access to economic endowments and the individual's ability to utilise them freely are of considerable significance. This paper examines to what extent some ethnic, religious and caste minorities suffer from chronic impoverishment, especially in rural India. What economic endowments are owned by whom and by how much? What is the level of education and occupational skill across different social groups? The analysis is based on the 61st round (2004-05) of the National Sample Survey Organisation's Consumption- Expenditure Survey.
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