ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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An Epistemic Change?

It was the Central Legislative Assembly of British India that first enacted the Foreigners Act, 1946, giving the government the powers to deal with “foreigners” in India. The enigmatic definition of the term “foreigner” in it was “one who is not Indian.” In December 1955, Parliament enacted the...

A Blinkered View of Humanities Education?

The draft National Education Policy, 2019 (DNEP) is an important document. It has had a fair share of criticism but that is to be expected given the diversity of opinions about education in our country. It is a sincere attempt to present a vision for the future of education in India. It is holistic in that it combines the vision of education from school to higher education within one document. It thus attempts a kind of unification of the aims and practices of education. Most importantly, as part of this vision, it strongly promotes a basic foundation of multidisciplinarity and liberal arts education at all levels. To say this in explicit terms and to say it with enough detail to make it seem as if it is workable is indeed commendable.

Has the Dial Moved on the Indian Sex Work Debate?

The politics of sex work has exercised civil society, feminists, governments and, of course, sex workers and the latter’s organisations. This trajectory is examined in the context of the last two decades in India and taking into consideration the relevant laws.

Provincialisation of ‘Transformative’ Politics

The left and the Dalit political parties put limits on the transformative politics that draws its support and sustenance from the normative ideals available in Karl Marx and B R Ambedkar. Arguably, these limits spring from the conditions of provincialisation of transformative politics into instrumentalities that are internal to electoral democracy.

Judging the Survivor

Is a woman’s testimony about experiencing sexual violence treated credibly in a court of law? Do social, casteist, and patriarchal notions overshadow the appraisal of her version of events and the evidence?

Unsettling of the Dominant Refugee Discourse(s)

In the dominant refugee discourse(s) the citizen is the normal, the insider, the one who belongs, while the refugee is the abnormal, the deviant, the outsider, the one who does not belong. Thus, the latter is not only a threat to the very existence and legitimacy of the state, but also, for this reason, dispensable for it and can be dispensed off by it.

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