ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Planning CommissionSubscribe to RSS - Planning Commission

Why Women’s Studies?

The dissolution of the Planning Commission and expiry of the Twelfth Plan has imperilled the futures of the centres for Women's Studies, and Study of Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policy across public universities in India. These centres were borne out of struggles for inclusion and continue to operate at the margins of the academic set-up. A critical appraisal of Women's Studies has been undertaken here to locate its relevance in contemporary times.

Evolving Centre–State Financial Relations

After the Fourteenth Finance Commission award, aggregate transfers as a percentage of gross domestic product has increased, while grants as a percentage of GDP has declined. The centre is resorting to cess and surcharges that are not shared with the states. This would mean denial of revenue to states, which goes against the spirit of the Constitution. Further, the states have a reduced untied fi scal space, with the union’s share in Centrally Sponsored Schemes in 2016–17 (BE) being reduced. Finally, in the absence of plan transfers, post 2017–18, the focus should be to develop a framework for non-fi nance commission grants to states which is predictable and certain.

Political Economy of Indian Economic Policy

The Evolution of Economic Policy in India: Selected Essays by P N Dhar; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2003; pp 255.

Twelfth Finance Commission and Panchayat Finances

Some issues for the consideration of the Twelfth Finance Commission in regard to its task of making recommendations to augment the Consolidated Fund of the states in order to supplement the resources of panchayats and municipalities.

Obituary : M J Manohar Rao

A committed academic, M J Manohar Rao was the quintessential problem-solver, whether in life or in economics.

Textile Industry : Future at Stake

For a National Common Market

D R Gadgil on Planning at the District Level

There is now very great need and scope for public sector planning in which district level planning must have a very important place. There is not only need but now a much greater possibility of transferring much larger resources to district level planning. Such plans, as D R Gadgil argued and his Wardha Plan demonstrated, have to be prepared with the help of experts and local level representatives and concerned people. The development needs of the vast rural India require this. Social scientists, activists as well as the Planning Commission and the state governments should now start afresh on this vital task.

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