A A A
Change Text Size

Interning Insurgent Populations: The Buried Histories of Indian Democracy

BibtexBibtexEndnoteEndnoteRISRISGoogle ScholarGoogle ScholarPrintPrintEmailEmail

Based on the memories of elderly Naga and Mizo villagers in north-east India who underwent grouping in the 1950s and 1960s, this article shows how the concept of "success" and "failure" used by studies of grouping is flawed, betraying a bureaucratic calculus. Whatever the overt reasons given for grouping, what underlies it is the assumption that all people in a given area, whether civilian or combatant, are potentially hostile. Grouping is thus an act of war rather than effective counter-insurgency. This article describes the process of grouping, forced labour, surveillance and starvation in the camps. While descriptions of the process of grouping are consistent, people's opinions vary on its implications for their own lives, depending on their past and current location.

Subscribers please login to access full text of the article.

Subscribe Now !

Get instant access to the complete EPW archives

New 3-Month Subscription to Digital Archives at just Rs 350 for India and $15 for overseas users.

  Subscribe  

Comments

EPW looks forward to your comments. Please note that comments are moderated as per our comments policy. They may take some time to appear. comment, if suitable, may be selected for publication in the Letters pages of EPW.