ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Negotiating the ‘Social’ in Elementary School Social Science

The rationale behind and lack of debate on the trifurcation of the social science textbooks published by the National Council of Educational Research and Training into history, geography, and social and political life is questioned, while an alternative is posed. The uncritical celebration of the nation-state, which is partof the nationalist identity-building project, is unpacked here.

Drinking Water, Sanitation and Waterborne Diseases

Using mainly primary level data from Lucknow and Kanpur districts of Uttar Pradesh, the study focuses on assessing determinants of drinking water, its impact on waterborne diseases, purification behaviour and improved sanitation facility. The findings reveal that sources of drinking water, income, family size, education, occupation and caste are the main determinants of purification behaviour and waterborne diseases.

National Family Health Survey-4 (2015–16)

The fourth round of National Family Health Survey (2015–16) is discussed with a brief exposition of the trends in household environment and sanitation, fertility, child health and child mortality, nutrition, health, and status of women between 2005–06 (NFHS-3) and 2015–16 (NFHS-4).

Livelihood Security of Home-based Beedi-rolling Workers in Uttar Pradesh

The livelihood security of households is a function of visible quantitative and invisible qualitative indicators, broadly based on private and public resources and institutional support. A survey of home-based women beedi-rolling workers (rural and urban) in Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh indicated that they live on the margin of society and function at the bottom of the economy. This article advocates active state intervention to empower workers to assert their rights to ensure secure livelihoods.

Business of Teacher Education in Haryana

It seems that the National Council for Teacher Education has failed to maintain the required standards of teacher education after promoting self-financed teacher-education institutions to meet the demand for and supply of teachers at primary, upper primary and secondary levels. A study conducted in Haryana shows how such institutions are a threat to the entire education system. Haryana has become a hub for getting degrees without attending classes in the privately-managed teacher-education colleges. The study also reviews various issues such as violation of rules and regulations, corruption, non-existing resources, poor teaching–learning process, etc.

Does ‘He’ Include ‘She’?

Section 64 of the Code of Criminal Procedure 1973 which deals with the serving of summons when the person concernced cannot be found, speaks of leaving the summons with “some adult male member of his family residing with him.” This provision is violative of Articles 14, 15 and 21 of the Constitution and the word “male” being unconstitutional, deserves to be struck down.

An Unequal Process of Urbanisation

Urbanisation in India has reportedly accelerated over the last decade, with a sharp rise in the number of towns and peri-urban areas. Cities, on the other hand, are believed to have become “exclusionary,” with in-migration remaining stagnant. This study uses primary census data since 1991 to question the hypothesis of exclusionary cities and argues that the larger towns and cities have grown uninterrupted, whereas smaller- and medium-sized towns have been slow to graduate to higher size classes.

Female Education

Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is perceived as an important tool for women’s empowerment through which women can break different sociocultural barriers. But a qualitative study conducted among 45 married urban women in Delhi and Yamuna Nagar district of Haryana explains how education is used to maintain the existing gender hierarchies and gender division of labour. It highlights that reproduction and transformation of social structures are evident in a novel manner where ideas of women’s emancipation and subordination coexist.

‘Two Class’ Distribution of Income in India

Results from the 2012–13 income tax data reveal that Indian incomes, particularly high salaries and wealth-related income, are statistically distributed into two distinct classes. The bulk of the reported income distribution can be explained by an exponential distribution, while a small fraction at the top follows a more unequal power law (Pareto) distribution. This distinction has important implications for inequality, and provides a point of comparison with similar statistical regularities observed in rich countries.

Changing Voting Behaviour in Kerala Elections

In Kerala, a state with its time-tested social and political tradition which seeks to bind all sections of people together, irrespective of religion or caste, the emergence of the National Democratic Alliance as an alternative to the two mainstream political fronts had its repercussions among a section of the minorities. The fluctuation in the voting preferences signals the crisis the Left Democratic Front is facing. Except for the extremely poor, all other socio-economic groups, including Dalits, Other Backward Castes, the lower classes and the younger generation, are highly volatile and are changing their political preferences, depending on the unfolding social reality.

Theoretical Analysis of ‘Demonetisation’

With the aid of simple theoretical tools used in classroom lectures, the implications of the recent “demonetisation” exercise in India are analysed. It lends support to conclusions reached by other authors on the impact of demonetisation with the aid of available data. Following Robert Lucas’s Nobel lecture, the merits of economic policies that assume the form of random shocks to an economic system are questioned. 

Nationalisation vs Privatisation

Coal production in India has not been commensurate with the growing energy demand. As a result, import dependence has increased, which has exposed the economy to higher prices and geopolitical risks. Coal India Limited, the monopoly public sector producer, is saddled with the problems of low productivity. Private sector participation in the sector is limited and restricted to captive mining. The aim of this article is to use a tool called “Discourse Network Analysis” and structurally analyse the configuration of debate on privatisation versus nationalisation from 1997 to 2013.

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