Making Pulses Affordable Again

The government has curbed pulse imports to shore up prices to levels above minimum support prices; this has had some success. But such a decision is only sustainable if domestic production is increased to meet demand in the long run, reducing India’s dependence on imports. In the past, pulse price rise was due to shortages and inadequate or delayed imports. Since, we do not produce enough  for our domestic consumption as of now, we require imports to cover the shortfall. 

The government has curbed pulse imports to shore up prices to levels above minimum support prices; this has had some success. But such a decision is only sustainable if domestic production is increased to meet demand in the long run, reducing India’s dependence on imports. In the past, pulse price rise was due to shortages and inadequate or delayed imports. Since, we do not produce enough  for our domestic consumption as of now, we require imports to cover the shortfall. 

Two articles look into policy measures necessary to increase domestic production of pulses, which is the only sustainable way to ensure the availability of pulses at affordable prices.

 

  •  Tulsi Lingareddy states that the persistent gap between demand and supply of pulses is only expected to widen if domestic production levels are not raised substantially through necessary policy measures.
     
  • P K Joshi, Avinash Kishore, and Devesh Roy suggest investing in research and extension, aggregating into farmer producer organisations, and paying growers or growing areas for the ecosystem services offered by pulses.

 

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