ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Primary Education and Minority Rights

In Pramati Educational and Cultural Trust v Union of India (2014), the Supreme Court preferred an outdated interpretation of minority rights under Article 30(1) in keeping all minority schools, aided and unaided, beyond the scrutiny posed by the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009. The Indian Supreme Court has an opportunity in Independent School Federation of India v State of Uttar Pradesh (2016) to correct this and redeem itself.

Behavioural Economics and Richard Thaler’s Contributions

What makes behavioural economics important for understanding human behaviour? What work has been ongoing in this field of study? What have Richard Thaler, this year’s “Nobel” prize winner, and his colleagues done to better understand human behaviour?

When ‘Anybody Can Be Brahmin’

The appointment of Dalit priests to temples in Kerala has been engendered by the growing departure of Brahmin youth from priestly jobs, coupled with existing aspirations of the lower castes to become priests in Brahminical temples. This move is aimed at the formation of a cohesive “Hindu community” through the reconfiguration of caste practices, not the eradication of caste.

Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act (2006) in Haryana

The Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2006 (PWDVA) was introduced after years of advocacy by women’s groups. However, over a decade since its enactment, the PWDVA is yet to see strong implementation; women continue to struggle with delays in judicial proceedings, inadequate court...

Bhopal Public Bike-sharing Scheme

The stated aim of the Bhopal Municipal Corporation’s ₹2.5 crore plan to import 500 high-tech bicycles for a bike-sharing scheme was to provide commuters with an environment-friendly and healthy option for commuting in the city. Can a model borrowed from developed countries work in the absence of sufficient demand, a conducive environment, and supporting infrastructure such as good road networks, bicycle lanes and regulated traffic?

Why Behavioural Economics Will Not Save the World

Behavioural economics is widely considered to be a significant break from standard economic modelling. What is different about the behavioural economics approach? Is it as revolutionary as we are led to believe? What else does research in this field offer?

North Korea and the Threat of Nuclear Annihilation

What is transparently clear is that political discussions in the United States around North Korea remain oblivious of the psychological effects of the war that persists into the seventh decade after its end. The advantage in political, social, cultural, and educational terms that the North Korean regime continues to derive from its masterful deployment of history and propaganda to keep in power and run the state itself as something of a concentration camp, is also not realised.

Human–Wildlife Conflict in India

Approaches for resolving incidences of human–wildlife conflict such as predator attacks on people or livestock typically use methods that address physical loss but ignore social, cultural, and emotional trauma. To holistically and more permanently alleviate conflicts, wildlife management agencies and other conservation practitioners require resources and training in outreach and public relations, and need to expand their toolkit of approaches in order to connect with varied stakeholders in a greater diversity of settings.

Promoting Solar Power as a Remunerative Crop

Anand, the Gujarat town that gave India its dairy cooperative movement, has now spawned in Dhundi village the world’s first solar cooperative that produces Solar Power as a Remunerative Crop. When compared to other models promoting solar irrigation in the country, the SPaRC model, which has successfully completed one year in Dhundi, offers multiple benefits across-the-board: it will control groundwater overexploitation, reduce the subsidy burden on DISCOMs, curtail carbon footprint of agriculture, and help double farmer incomes

A Cat’s and Rat’s View of History

Arun Sadhu (1941–2017) was a journalist, writer and teacher whose works reflected his ability to listen and eloquence to express the sufferings of the marginalised and the hypocrisies of the powerful. His life itself was testimony to his aversion to pomposity and manipulation. Here, writer, award-winning film-maker and Sadhu’s friend for over four decades, Arun Khopkar, writes about him.

How Much Energy Do We Need?

How much energy we need for a decent standard of living for everyone is a question at the heart of energy planning, but rarely addressed. Generally, such estimation is based on a desired gross domestic product growth. However, even achieving this GDP may not necessarily ensure the satisfaction of everyone’s basic needs. Energy planning should link energy and its end-use and end-user directly, promoting equity, and providing a better monitoring framework for energy use. End-use focused, bottom-up, disaggregated energy planning is such an approach and we urge that this should be the basis of energy planning in the country.

Delhi–Mumbai Industrial Corridor

The Delhi–Mumbai Industrial Corridor represents a re-centralisation of urban planning in India with the primary objective to foster export-oriented growth. An analysis of census and manufacturing data shows that the DMIC is likely to increase regional inequality. Moreover, rather than fostering regional integration, this state-led corridor development remains a series of discontinuous and fragmented territories.

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